In situ Formation of Polymer Microparticles in Bacterial Nanocellulose Using Alternative and Sustainable Solvents to Incorporate Lipophilic Drugs

ORCID
0000-0002-5914-9251
Affiliation
Division of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Cauerstraße 4, 91058 Erlangen, Germany
Bellmann, Tom;
GND
1292100001
Affiliation
Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Lessingstraße 8, 07743 Jena, Germany
Thamm, Jana;
GND
1223627691
ORCID
0000-0002-9839-5527
Affiliation
Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Lessingstraße 8, 07743 Jena, Germany
Beekmann, Uwe;
GND
131561332
Affiliation
Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Lessingstraße 8, 07743 Jena, Germany
Kralisch, Dana;
Affiliation
Division of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Cauerstraße 4, 91058 Erlangen, Germany
Fischer, Dagmar

Bacterial nanocellulose has been widely investigated in drug delivery, but the incorporation of lipophilic drugs and controlling release kinetics still remain a challenge. The inclusion of polymer particles to encapsulate drugs could address both problems but is reported sparely. In the present study, a formulation approach based on in situ precipitation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) within bacterial nanocellulose was developed using and comparing the conventional solvent N -methyl-2-pyrrolidone and the alternative solvents poly(ethylene glycol), Cyrene TM and ethyl lactate. Using the best-performing solvents N -methyl-2-pyrrolidone and ethyl lactate, their fast diffusion during phase inversion led to the formation of homogenously distributed polymer microparticles with average diameters between 2.0 and 6.6 µm within the cellulose matrix. Despite polymer inclusion, the water absorption value of the material still remained at ~50% of the original value and the material was able to release 32 g/100 cm 2 of the bound water. Mechanical characteristics were not impaired compared to the native material. The process was suitable for encapsulating the highly lipophilic drugs cannabidiol and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid and enabled their sustained release with zero order kinetics over up to 10 days. Conclusively, controlled drug release for highly lipophilic compounds within bacterial nanocellulose could be achieved using sustainable solvents for preparation.

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